THEN NOW

The main guardhouse, also called "Death Gate", and the railway built in 1944, as the last stop for trains carrying Jews. Before that time, trains stopped at a station between the Main Camp (Auschwitz I) and Birkenau (Auschwitz II).
The place seems to have stopped in time. Almost everything has been preserved out of respect for the victims of this true "death industry".
S. Mucha, 1945

THEN NOW

Same caption as the previous photo.

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Photograph taken by SS men in the winter of 1943/44.
Prisoners work on the construction of the second wing of the main gate / guardhouse.

THEN NOW

Part of the field seen from the guardhouse tower, at the main gate.
It is easy to see that most installations no longer exist. Many of them destroyed by the Nazis themselves with the intention of eliminating evidence against them.
The buildings (Barracks) that appear in the foreground were reserved for prisoners quarantined when they reached the camp.

THEN NOW

This photograph was taken from above a railway car, vehicle or building. I was unable to take the current photo from the same spot, but it is the famous "Jewish Ramp". Place where Jews were separated to be eliminated in the gas chambers or sent to be subjected to slave labor.
Place of forced separation from family and loved ones.

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Some of the nearly eight thousand prisoners left inside the camp when the Red Army arrived, chatted in front of one of the barracks where they probably lived during captivity.

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Winter of 1944/45.
The inert body of a female victim who could not endure constant hunger, mistreatment and the cold snow that now surrounds her, lies in front of one of the barracks at Auschwitz Birkenau.

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Interior of one of the barracks for women. Hundreds of prisoners flock to a space that previously served as a stable for 52 horses. The lack of latrines, adequate heating and three-story bunk beds, for three people each, meant that the place did not provide the minimum conditions for bleeding after a strenuous 12 to 15 hour day.
Photo of Sovietic Film

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Dr. Hewlett Johnson, an English priest nicknamed "the red dean of Canterbury" for his unyielding support for the Soviet Union and its allies during the war. He is standing in the center of the photo, together with other members of a British delegation guided by Prof. Jan Sehn, Polish magistrate, shortly after the camp was released.
The blankets that served to relieve the prisoners' cold were still scattered on the floor.